In our article Debit Card use Surpasses Credit Cards, for the first time in Visa’s history, debit card use surpassed Credit Cards in the fourth quarter 2008.  On page 14 of Visa’s Form 8-K, filed on April 29, 2009, U.S. debit card volume was $206 billion, versus a credit card volume of $203 billion.  The growth of debit cards was up 5.5%, while credit cards were down 6.9%.
Imagine your own ties in the country where you live. Would a consular office of another country consider that you have a residence there that you do not intend to abandon? It is likely that the answer would be "yes" if you have a job, a family, if you own or rent a house or apartment, or if you have other commitments that would require you to return to your country at the conclusion of a visit abroad. Each person's situation is different.
In western Europe in the late 19th century and early 20th century, passports and visas were not generally necessary for moving from one country to another. The relatively high speed and large movements of people travelling by train would have caused bottlenecks if regular passport controls had been used.[5] Passports and visas became usually necessary as travel documents only after World War I.[6]
I would say a tourist visa (6 month) is best because a fiance visa limits your time and is not one that can be renewed like a tourist visa. You can renew a tourist visa for 6 months. It does not always get approved but it is something that is possible with the tourist and not with the fiance visa. Now if you plan on getting married as stated in the fiance visa then in… 

Palau expresses its deepest thanks for your support through the PPEF. The PPEF will help provide the financial and moral support necessary to continue our mission of protecting Palau’s natural environment for future generations. With your help, we will continue to hold true to our reputation as one of the most beautiful places and best diving destinations in the world.
Finding that an entry visa to the United States has been granted is cause for great celebration for most applicants, but that celebration is often premature: Visas allow travelers to board their transportation to the U.S., but they by no means guarantee entry. You cannot stay in the U.S. at all with a visa alone. Determining officers of the Department of Homeland Security at the U.S. port of entry are empowered to turn away even people with visas and send them back where they came from if they sense some subterfuge or illegal intent.
A country’s visa policy is a rule that states who may or may not enter the country. The policy may allow passport holders of one country to enter visa-free but not the passport holders of another country. Most visa policies are bilateral, meaning that two countries will allow visa-free travel to each other’s citizens, but this is not always the case. For example, Canadian passport holders may travel to Grenada visa-free, but Grenadians must apply for a visa in order to travel to Canada.
The expiration date of your visa is the last day you may use the visa to enter the U.S. It does not indicate how long you may stay in the U.S. Your stay is determined by the Department of Homeland Security at the port of entry. As long as you comply with the Department of Homeland Security decision on the conditions of your stay, you should have no problem.

^ Roberts, Jeff John (12 September 2016). "Homeland Security Plans to Expand Fingerprint and Eye Scanning at Borders". Fortune. Fortune Media IP Limited. Retrieved 24 April 2019. Unlike with documents, it’s very hard for a traveler to present a forged copy of a fingerprint or iris. That’s why the U.S. Department of Homeland Security plans to vastly expand the amount of biometric data it collects at the borders. According to Passcode, a new program will ramp up a process to scan fingers and eyes in order to stop people entering and exiting the country on someone else’s passport.
A visa is a stamp, sticker, or electronic record sitting inside your passport book that verifies that you’re allowed to stay in a specific country for a certain amount of time. They specify the length of your stay, what territories you may visit, your scheduled date of entry, how many times you may enter the country, and whether or not you’re allowed to study or work during your trip. Not all countries and territories require visas, but it’s best to stay up-to-date on regulations and requirements by doing your research and working with a travel agent. Immigration officials can revoke your visa at any time, and it’s important to remember that they never truly guarantee entry, especially in countries where visas are separate from formal entry permission. An official will likely review your circumstances once you arrive to determine whether or not you may enter. 
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