The United States has several visa restrictions that affect whether a potential visitor is granted a tourist visa. Visa applications may be denied on the grounds of health, a criminal record or other security reasons. For example, anyone with a significant communicable disease or a physical or mental health disorder that poses a safety threat will not be allowed entry into the US.
The unofficial posture is that few people can afford to live without working for more than six months. Because people coming to the U.S. on B2 visas are not allowed to work, they will in all likelihood be issued a maximum six-month I-94. If the entrant is seeking medical treatment that may quite reasonably be expected to take more than six months, the determining officer can issue a one-year I-94 without consulting a supervisor. A traveler with a B1 professional visa, meaning they have work the State Department has already determined is acceptable under all its conditions, can stay up to three years on a single I-94. In an extreme circumstance, then, a person with a one-month B1 visa could legally stay in the USA for three years, not one month.
The EVUS website is now open to the public for enrollments at www.EVUS.gov.  CBP will not collect a fee for EVUS enrollment at this time. CBP anticipates the eventual implementation of an EVUS enrollment fee, but does not have a time frame. Until the implementation of a fee, travelers can enroll in EVUS without charge.  The Department of Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will keep visa holders informed of new information throughout the year. For further information, please visit www.cbp.gov/EVUS.‎
Both B1 and B2 are visas for temporary stay in US. The B1 visa is business visa and can be used by the applicant to travel to US for business related issues. The B2 visa is tourist visa and the applicant can visit places and must have entered US only for touring purposes. No activities of any financial gain must be carried out during visit by the tourist visa holder. Both B1 and B2 visa…

To circumvent this Arab League boycott of Israel, the Israeli immigration services have now mostly ceased to stamp foreign nationals' passports on either entry to or exit from Israel. Since 15 January 2013, Israel no longer stamps foreign passports at Ben Gurion Airport, giving passengers a card instead that reads: "Since January 2013 a pilot scheme has been introduced whereby visitors are given an entry card instead of an entry stamp on arrival. You should keep this card with your passport until you leave. This is evidence of your legal entry into Israel and may be required, particularly at any crossing points into the Occupied Palestinian Territories." [135] Passports are still (as of 22 June 2017) stamped at Erez when travelling into and out of Gaza. Also, passports are still stamped (as of 22 June 2017) at the Jordan Valley/Sheikh Hussein and Yitzhak Rabin/Arava land borders with Jordan.
Citizens of member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations do not require tourist visas to visit another member state, with the exception of Myanmar. Until 2009, Burmese citizens were required to have visas to enter all other ASEAN countries. Following the implementation of visa exemption agreements with the other ASEAN countries, in 2016 Burmese citizens are only required to have visas to enter Malaysia and Singapore. Myanmar and Singapore had agreed on a visa exemption scheme set to be implemented on 1 December 2016.[88] ASEAN citizens are entitled to use the Burmese visa on arrival facility.
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