Before applying for a temporary worker visa at the U.S. Consulate, you may need an approved Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker, from USCIS. This petition must be submitted by your prospective employer no earlier than 6 months prior to your proposed employment start date. Your employer should file the petition as soon as possible within the 6-month period to allow adequate time for processing. Once approved, your employer will be sent Form I-797, Notice of Action. For more information, visit the USCIS Temporary Workers webpage.
A U.S. visa is valid for entry to the United States for the period of time indicated on the visa, even when the passport is expired or no longer valid. You can do this as long as the visa is not damaged, the nationality has not changed, and the terms under which you obtained your original visa have not changed. You will need to carry the passport containing the valid visa together with the new passport when you travel and will need to present both at the U.S. port of entry. The Consulate cannot transfer or reissue an existing visa into a new passport. If your new passport contains a name change, it is recommended you travel with an original copy of your name change or marriage certificate.
Tourist visas and transit visas are very similar in many ways. The major difference is that a tourist visa allows a traveler to spend more time enjoying the country while a transit visa simply gives the traveler enough time to pass through to the final destination. The host country’s visa requirements will tell you which visa is appropriate for your travel needs.
Imagine your own ties in the country where you live. Would a consular office of another country consider that you have a residence there that you do not intend to abandon? It is likely that the answer would be "yes" if you have a job, a family, if you own or rent a house or apartment, or if you have other commitments that would require you to return to your country at the conclusion of a visit abroad. Each person's situation is different.
Long-stay visas give you more time in your destination country, allowing your stay to last anywhere from months to years. Whether your needs revolve around your family, your studies, or your work, these visas are great options for folks who need to be abroad for quite sometime, but not permanently. However, those who are looking to become permanent residents of the foreign country in question can use these visas as a stepping stone. A residence visa in particular would be a great choice for those looking to move abroad for good. Similarly, if you’re looking to immigrate and become a permanent citizen, an immigrant visa is likely the best choice for you.
Whether you are applying for the first time or renewing your visa, you will use the same application process (please review How to Apply, above). Some applicants seeking to renew their visas in certain visa classes may be eligible for the Interview Waiver Program (IWP) which allows qualified individuals to apply for visa renewals without being interviewed in person by a U.S. consular officer. Review the instructions on the website of the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you will apply to determine if the IWP is available and if you qualify.
In some cases, a visa is issued by immigration officials when someone crosses a border into a new country. In other instances, people must apply for one before traveling. During the application process, the applicant may be asked if he or she has enough money to survive in the country for the duration of the visa, and inquiries may be made about the applicant's health, character, and intentions for the planned visit. In some cases, applicants are also fingerprinted and photographed.

Immigration law delegates the responsibility for issuance or refusal of visas to consular officers overseas. They have the final say on all visa cases. By regulation, the U.S. Department of State has authority to review consular decisions, but this authority is limited to the interpretation of law, as contrasted to determinations of facts. The question at issue in such denials, whether an applicant possesses the required residence abroad, is a factual one. Therefore, it falls exclusively within the authority of consular officers at our Foreign Service posts to resolve. An applicant can influence the post to change a prior visa denial only through the presentation of new convincing evidence of strong ties.
Some types of visa like B1 may not expire with the expiry of the holder's passport. An unexpired, endorsed visa in an expired passport may be presented for entry into the USA, as long as the visa itself has not been cancelled, is undamaged, is less than 10 years old and is presented with a valid non-expired passport, provided that both passports are for the same nationality. 

In Chrysogelou's case, she qualified for a visa waiver for her trip to the United States. And while the waiver was valid when she began her trip, the German-based Lufthansa imposes an additional requirement: Passengers must have valid documents for the "entire duration" of their stay. (After I asked Lufthansa about her case, it rescheduled her flights to her original dates.)

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) requires that its citizens obtain an exit visa stating the traveller's destination country and time to be spent abroad before leaving the country. Additionally, North Korean authorities also require North Korean citizens obtain a re-entry visa from a North Korean embassy or North Korean mission abroad before being allowed back into North Korea.
If a person enters the U.S. with a visa under K-1 status, they are entering the U.S. legally as a nonimmigrant. This status may be granted to them by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) after the petition their fiancé(e) filed for them is approved by the USCIS. After their legal entry, they may then be eligible to file for a work permit. This work permit will be valid for the duration of their visa, which will be 90 days. They may become eligible to extend their work permit if they marry your fiancé(e) within the 90 days and immediately file the appropriate application. 

Azerbaijan also strictly bans any visit by foreign citizens to the separatist region of Nagorno-Karabakh[138] (the de facto independent Republic of Artsakh), its surrounding territories, and the Azerbaijani exclaves of Karki, Yuxarı Əskipara, Barxudarlı, and Sofulu which are de jure part of Azerbaijan but under the control of Armenia, without the prior consent of the government of Azerbaijan. Foreign citizens who enter these territories will be permanently banned from entering the Republic of Azerbaijan[139] and will be included in their "list of personae non gratae".[140] As of 21 February 2019, the list mentioned 803 people.
H-3 Trainee or Special Education Exchange Visas are nonimmigrant visas that allow you to travel to the U.S. for training. The main goal of this visa is to receive training in the U.S. that you will later use in your home country. To qualify, the training cannot be available in your home country or related to graduate medical studies. During the application process, an immigration officer will ask you to show that you intend to return to your home country after the program is completed.
^ "China to Start Fingerprinting Foreign Visitors". Air Canada. 31 January 2019. Retrieved 7 July 2018. Effective April 27, 2018, border control authorities at all of China’s ports of entry, including its airports, will start collecting the fingerprints of all foreign visitors aged between 14 and 70. Diplomatic passport holders and beneficiaries of reciprocal agreements are exempted..
If you're traveling internationally, you might need a visa, which is an endorsement on your passport indicating that you may enter a country. Americans don't need visas to enter 116 countries – including 26 in Europe – for short-term tourism, business or layovers on the way to a non-treaty country. However, some popular destinations such as China and Brazil do require U.S. citizens to obtain visas.
At present, 38 countries in the Visa Waiver Program are Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovenia, Slovakia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
Unfortunately, there is not one solid answer when it comes to the question of how long a visa lasts. Different countries have different regulations when it comes to letting in foreigners, and different visas are approved for different purposes. Some travelers need to stay in their destination country for lengthy periods of time due to business, study, or family emergencies. Other travelers are going abroad strictly for fun, and this could limit their length of stay depending on the destination. What’s most important is having an understanding of what type of visa you’re going to need on your journey, as this will allow you to apply for the correct documentation and acquire a visa that best suits your personal needs. It’s crucial that you do your research or seek out someone who can help you get off on the right foot, and Travel Visa Pro is here to help you gain a better understanding of the types of visas available.
The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) requires that its citizens obtain an exit visa stating the traveller's destination country and time to be spent abroad before leaving the country. Additionally, North Korean authorities also require North Korean citizens obtain a re-entry visa from a North Korean embassy or North Korean mission abroad before being allowed back into North Korea.
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