H2-B Seasonal Worker Visas are nonimmigrant visas offered for temporary, irregular, or seasonal work. Jobs that are needed on a "one-time" basis or to help a company during moments of heavy activity also qualify. To get an H-2B visa, the position cannot be in agriculture or farming. Working at a hotel during the busy summer season or helping in the construction of a single building project are both examples of jobs that will likely meet H-2B requirements. To be eligible for an H-2B visa you must also be a national of a qualifying country. Learn more about H2-B visas.


Visas generally expire after a set period of time. In some cases, one may be extended by permission, while in other instances, people need to leave a country and re-enter it to receive a new one. They can also establish the number of times someone enters and leaves a country. In the case of a single entry visa, it is canceled as soon as the traveler leaves the country. In multiple entry, someone may leave and return several times before the visa is canceled.
Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
Entering a country without a valid visa or visa exemption may result in detention and removal (deportation or exclusion) from the country. Undertaking activities that are not authorised by the status of entry (for example, working while possessing a non-worker tourist status) can result in the individual being deemed liable for deportation—commonly referred to as an illegal alien. Such violation is not a violation of a visa, despite the common misuse of the phrase, but a violation of status; hence the term "out of status".
Visas generally expire after a set period of time. In some cases, one may be extended by permission, while in other instances, people need to leave a country and re-enter it to receive a new one. They can also establish the number of times someone enters and leaves a country. In the case of a single entry visa, it is canceled as soon as the traveler leaves the country. In multiple entry, someone may leave and return several times before the visa is canceled.
As of 2019, the Henley & Partners passport index ranks the Japanese, Singaporean and South Korean passports as the ones with the most visa exemptions by other nations, allowing holders of those passports to visit 189 countries without obtaining a visa in advance of arrival.[89] However, as of 6 June 2019, the Passport Index ranks the United Arab Emirates passport as the one with the most visa exemptions by other nations, allowing holders of this passport to visit 173 countries[90] without obtaining a visa in advance of arrival.
Spouse visas, marriage visas, retirement visas, temporary worker visas, student visas, research visas, and asylum visas are other options for those looking to take a lengthier trip. These visas can be perfect options for those needing to go abroad to be with family, be away on business for an extended period of time, pursue their education in a foreign country, or avoid persecution in their home country.
If you are planning urgent travel to the United States, you will need to contact our helpline informing that you have urgent need for your passport and request for an update of your visa application. You will have to wait for the response from the Embassy/Consulate. When your passport/document is returned to you, it will be delivered to the document delivery address you have provided at the time of appointment scheduling. 

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A visa (from the Latin charta visa, meaning "paper that has been seen")[1] is a conditional authorisation granted by a territory to a foreigner, allowing them to enter, remain within, or to leave that territory. Visas typically may include limits on the duration of the foreigner's stay, areas within the country they may enter, the dates they may enter, the number of permitted visits or an individual's right to work in the country in question. Visas are associated with the request for permission to enter a territory and thus are, in most countries, distinct from actual formal permission for an alien to enter and remain in the country. In each instance, a visa is subject to entry permission by an immigration official at the time of actual entry, and can be revoked at any time. A visa most commonly takes the form of a sticker endorsed in the applicant's passport or other travel document.
If a person enters the U.S. with a visa under K-1 status, they are entering the U.S. legally as a nonimmigrant. This status may be granted to them by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) after the petition their fiancé(e) filed for them is approved by the USCIS. After their legal entry, they may then be eligible to file for a work permit. This work permit will be valid for the duration of their visa, which will be 90 days. They may become eligible to extend their work permit if they marry your fiancé(e) within the 90 days and immediately file the appropriate application.

In accordance with the agreement signed between the United States and China to extend visa validity, beginning on November 29, 2016, Chinese citizens with 10-year B1, B2 or B1/B2 visas in Peoples’ Republic of China passports will be required to update their biographical and other information from their visa application via a website every two years, or upon getting a new passport or B1, B2, or B1/B2 visa, whichever occurs first.  This mechanism is called EVUS - Electronic Visa Update System.
So, for example, someone who arrives in the U.S. with a fiancé visa (K-1) and applies for a work permit will receive one that lasts only until the 90-day termination of that person’s K-1 visa. Although it might sound like this would create problems for fiancés who plan to apply for green cards after marriage and stay in the United States, it actually doesn’t. That’s because the fiance can simply apply to adjust status as soon as they’ve gotten married, and then apply for an EAD that lasts even longer, at that time.
J visa holders subject to the two-year rule are not permitted to remain in the United States and apply for an adjustment/change of status to a prohibited nonimmigrant status (for example, from a J visa to an H visa) or to apply for legal permanent resident status (Green Card) without first returning home for two years or obtaining an approved waiver. Whether you are subject to the two-year rule is determined by a number of factors, including your source of funding and your country's "Skills List." It is not determined by the amount of time you spend in the United States.

Imagine your own ties in the country where you live. Would a consular office of another country consider that you have a residence there that you do not intend to abandon? It is likely that the answer would be "yes" if you have a job, a family, if you own or rent a house or apartment, or if you have other commitments that would require you to return to your country at the conclusion of a visit abroad. Each person's situation is different.


Visas generally expire after a set period of time. In some cases, one may be extended by permission, while in other instances, people need to leave a country and re-enter it to receive a new one. They can also establish the number of times someone enters and leaves a country. In the case of a single entry visa, it is canceled as soon as the traveler leaves the country. In multiple entry, someone may leave and return several times before the visa is canceled.
A visa allows a foreign citizen to travel to a U.S. port-of-entry (generally an airport) and request permission to enter the United States. A visa does not guarantee entry into the United States. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials at the port-of-entry have authority to permit or deny admission to the United States. If you are allowed to enter the United States, the CBP official will provide an admission stamp or a paper Form I-94, Arrival/Departure Record. Learn more about admissions and entry requirements, restrictions about bringing food, agricultural products, and other restricted/prohibited goods, and more by reviewing the CBP website.
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