If you're traveling internationally, you might need a visa, which is an endorsement on your passport indicating that you may enter a country. Americans don't need visas to enter 116 countries – including 26 in Europe – for short-term tourism, business or layovers on the way to a non-treaty country. However, some popular destinations such as China and Brazil do require U.S. citizens to obtain visas.
International travel can be incredibly confusing at times for everyone, from new explorers to seasoned globetrotters and everyone in between. With the research, the paperwork, and the actual trip-planning, it can be exhausting and frustrating for one to try and make sure they have all of the accurate information needed before embarking on their journey. Travelers often ask questions about passports and visas, with some of the most common questions being about visa validity. 

Traditional visas can either be stamped or glued into your passport. If your visa is glued into your passport, it is usually a small document that includes your name, passport number, place of birth, reason for travel and expiration date. Stamped visas typically have less information on them. They usually only have the destination and date from which the visa is valid and official instructions stating how many days the visa is valid for.
Tourist visas, called visitor visas in the United States, are available for travelers from many countries who are coming for recreational or medical purposes. These visas are typically good for six months. Transit visas are available to foreigners who are simply passing through the United States or making a brief stop at a port or airport. Transit visa applicants must provide evidence that they will be in continuous transit to a foreign destination while in the United States. As of November 2012, both visitor visas and transit visas cost $160 per person, although additional fees may apply. Citizens of nearly 40 countries are allowed to travel in the United States without a visa under the Visa Waiver Program.
In our article Debit Card use Surpasses Credit Cards, for the first time in Visa’s history, debit card use surpassed Credit Cards in the fourth quarter 2008.  On page 14 of Visa’s Form 8-K, filed on April 29, 2009, U.S. debit card volume was $206 billion, versus a credit card volume of $203 billion.  The growth of debit cards was up 5.5%, while credit cards were down 6.9%.
Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) requires that its citizens obtain an exit visa stating the traveller's destination country and time to be spent abroad before leaving the country. Additionally, North Korean authorities also require North Korean citizens obtain a re-entry visa from a North Korean embassy or North Korean mission abroad before being allowed back into North Korea.
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