If you're traveling internationally, you might need a visa, which is an endorsement on your passport indicating that you may enter a country. Americans don't need visas to enter 116 countries – including 26 in Europe – for short-term tourism, business or layovers on the way to a non-treaty country. However, some popular destinations such as China and Brazil do require U.S. citizens to obtain visas.
Both B1 and B2 are visas for temporary stay in US. The B1 visa is business visa and can be used by the applicant to travel to US for business related issues. The B2 visa is tourist visa and the applicant can visit places and must have entered US only for touring purposes. No activities of any financial gain must be carried out during visit by the tourist visa holder. Both B1 and B2 visa…

In some cases, a visa is issued by immigration officials when someone crosses a border into a new country. In other instances, people must apply for one before traveling. During the application process, the applicant may be asked if he or she has enough money to survive in the country for the duration of the visa, and inquiries may be made about the applicant's health, character, and intentions for the planned visit. In some cases, applicants are also fingerprinted and photographed.


A valid U.S. visa in an expired passport is still valid. Unless canceled or revoked, a visa is valid until its expiration date. If you have a valid visa in your expired passport, do not remove it from your expired passport. You may use your valid visa in your expired passport along with a new valid passport for travel and admission to the United States.  

So, for example, someone who arrives in the U.S. with a fiancé visa (K-1) and applies for a work permit will receive one that lasts only until the 90-day termination of that person’s K-1 visa. Although it might sound like this would create problems for fiancés who plan to apply for green cards after marriage and stay in the United States, it actually doesn’t. That’s because the fiance can simply apply to adjust status as soon as they’ve gotten married, and then apply for an EAD that lasts even longer, at that time.

Some countries apply the principle of reciprocity in their visa policy. A country's visa policy is called 'reciprocal' if it imposes visa requirement against citizens of all the countries that impose visa requirements against its own citizens. The opposite is rarely true: a country rarely lifts visa requirements against citizens of all the countries that also lift visa requirements against its own citizens, unless a prior bilateral agreement has been made.
Citizens of Canada and Mexico may be eligible for NAFTA Professional (TN) Nonimmigrant status if they work in a qualifying profession. TN status is very similar to H-1B status. To be eligible, you must have a higher education degree, or its equivalent, and a job offer from a U.S. employer. However, if you do not have a degree but have acquired similar skills after working for several years in a specialty occupation, you may also be eligible. Learn more about NAFTA work visas.

The unofficial posture is that few people can afford to live without working for more than six months. Because people coming to the U.S. on B2 visas are not allowed to work, they will in all likelihood be issued a maximum six-month I-94. If the entrant is seeking medical treatment that may quite reasonably be expected to take more than six months, the determining officer can issue a one-year I-94 without consulting a supervisor. A traveler with a B1 professional visa, meaning they have work the State Department has already determined is acceptable under all its conditions, can stay up to three years on a single I-94. In an extreme circumstance, then, a person with a one-month B1 visa could legally stay in the USA for three years, not one month.
Entering a country without a valid visa or visa exemption may result in detention and removal (deportation or exclusion) from the country. Undertaking activities that are not authorised by the status of entry (for example, working while possessing a non-worker tourist status) can result in the individual being deemed liable for deportation—commonly referred to as an illegal alien. Such violation is not a violation of a visa, despite the common misuse of the phrase, but a violation of status; hence the term "out of status".
Unfortunately, there is not one solid answer when it comes to the question of how long a visa lasts. Different countries have different regulations when it comes to letting in foreigners, and different visas are approved for different purposes. Some travelers need to stay in their destination country for lengthy periods of time due to business, study, or family emergencies. Other travelers are going abroad strictly for fun, and this could limit their length of stay depending on the destination. What’s most important is having an understanding of what type of visa you’re going to need on your journey, as this will allow you to apply for the correct documentation and acquire a visa that best suits your personal needs. It’s crucial that you do your research or seek out someone who can help you get off on the right foot, and Travel Visa Pro is here to help you gain a better understanding of the types of visas available.
A country’s visa policy is a rule that states who may or may not enter the country. The policy may allow passport holders of one country to enter visa-free but not the passport holders of another country. Most visa policies are bilateral, meaning that two countries will allow visa-free travel to each other’s citizens, but this is not always the case. For example, Canadian passport holders may travel to Grenada visa-free, but Grenadians must apply for a visa in order to travel to Canada.
The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) requires that its citizens obtain an exit visa stating the traveller's destination country and time to be spent abroad before leaving the country. Additionally, North Korean authorities also require North Korean citizens obtain a re-entry visa from a North Korean embassy or North Korean mission abroad before being allowed back into North Korea.
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