H-3 Trainee or Special Education Exchange Visas are nonimmigrant visas that allow you to travel to the U.S. for training. The main goal of this visa is to receive training in the U.S. that you will later use in your home country. To qualify, the training cannot be available in your home country or related to graduate medical studies. During the application process, an immigration officer will ask you to show that you intend to return to your home country after the program is completed.

The issuing authority may also require applicants to attest that they have no criminal convictions, or that they not participate in certain activities (like prostitution or drug trafficking). Some countries will deny visas if travellers' passports show evidence of citizenship of, or travel to, a country that is considered hostile by that country. For example, some Arabic-oriented countries will not issue visas to nationals of Israel and those whose passports bear evidence of visiting Israel.
Some visa applications require further administrative processing, which takes additional time after your interview with a Consular Officer. You will be advised of this possibility during your interview. When additional administrative processing is required, the length of processing time will vary based on the circumstances of each case. You are reminded to apply early for your visa, well in advance of your anticipated date of travel.
In accordance with the agreement signed between the United States and China to extend visa validity, beginning on November 29, 2016, Chinese citizens with 10-year B1, B2 or B1/B2 visas in Peoples’ Republic of China passports will be required to update their biographical and other information from their visa application via a website every two years, or upon getting a new passport or B1, B2, or B1/B2 visa, whichever occurs first.  This mechanism is called EVUS - Electronic Visa Update System.
VISAs are NOT required. 30-days Tourist Visa will be issued upon arrival and may be extended within 7 days in advance with approval of the Chief of Immigration for a fee of US$50.00 before expiration date of the visa. (Note: Maximum of 90 days: 30 days upon arrival plus 2 extensions at US$50.00 fee per extension. After which visitors must exit the country). Citizens of United States of America, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Guam, and the Common Wealth of Northern Marianas Islands with valid passports are issued 1 year Visa upon arrival. Citizens of Myanmar and Bangladesh must have a pre-approved visa.

Tourist visas are common for those who travel for pleasure or for short medical procedures. They are not typically used for work, study or significant family business. Tourist visa restrictions and costs vary widely depending on the country, but many allow stays of from three to six months. Fees also vary widely, as does the application process. Each country’s intent in issuing both tourist and transit visas is to prevent travelers whom they consider high-security risks from entering their borders.

Previously, foreign travelers granted entry by CBP officials received a paper Form I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record). This process is now automated, with some exceptions. If you received a paper Form I-94 or I-94W and failed to turn in your paper Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record to the commercial airline or CBP when you departed the U.S., see the CBP Website for instructions. Do not send your paper Form I-94 or I-94W to the U.S. Embassy or Consulate General.
It’s important to note that the visa duration granted only specifies a period during which the holder can travel to the US to apply for admission. The final decision to permit entry into the US and on the permitted length of stay will be made at the border by the United States Customs and Border Protection Officer when you attempt to enter the country.
Having a U.S. visa allows you to travel to a port of entry, airport or land border crossing, and request permission of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Customs and Border Protection (CBP) inspector to enter the United States. While having a visa does not guarantee entry to the United States, it does indicate a consular officer at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate abroad has determined you are eligible to seek entry for that specific purpose. DHS/CBP inspectors, guardians of the nation’s borders, are responsible for admission of travelers to the United States, for a specified status and period of time. DHS also has responsibility for immigration matters while you are present in the United States.

The issuing authority may also require applicants to attest that they have no criminal convictions, or that they not participate in certain activities (like prostitution or drug trafficking). Some countries will deny visas if travellers' passports show evidence of citizenship of, or travel to, a country that is considered hostile by that country. For example, some Arabic-oriented countries will not issue visas to nationals of Israel and those whose passports bear evidence of visiting Israel.
The B1 professional and B2 tourist -- pleasure travel -- visas are typically issued for six-month periods, but the length is entirely within the decision-making process of the officer who happens to get the case, inspect the application and make the determination. Again, the length of time printed on the visa does not determine how long the visitor may stay in the U.S. Rather, it determines how long the visitor has to make the journey to the U.S., where the I-94 document may or may not be issued that details the length of the stay.
A visa is a stamp, sticker, or electronic record sitting inside your passport book that verifies that you’re allowed to stay in a specific country for a certain amount of time. They specify the length of your stay, what territories you may visit, your scheduled date of entry, how many times you may enter the country, and whether or not you’re allowed to study or work during your trip. Not all countries and territories require visas, but it’s best to stay up-to-date on regulations and requirements by doing your research and working with a travel agent. Immigration officials can revoke your visa at any time, and it’s important to remember that they never truly guarantee entry, especially in countries where visas are separate from formal entry permission. An official will likely review your circumstances once you arrive to determine whether or not you may enter.
So, for example, someone who arrives in the U.S. with a fiancé visa (K-1) and applies for a work permit will receive one that lasts only until the 90-day termination of that person’s K-1 visa. Although it might sound like this would create problems for fiancés who plan to apply for green cards after marriage and stay in the United States, it actually doesn’t. That’s because the fiance can simply apply to adjust status as soon as they’ve gotten married, and then apply for an EAD that lasts even longer, at that time.

The "two-year rule" is the common term used for a section of U.S. immigration law which requires many exchange visitors to return to their home countries and be physically present there for at least two years after the conclusion of their exchange visit before they can return to the U.S. under certain types of visas, specifically H, K, L and immigrant visas. It is important to note that only a preliminary finding of whether the two-year rule applies to you is made on your DS-2019 when your J-1 visa is issued. The final decision will be made only if you later choose to apply for an H, L, K or immigrant visa.


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Government authorities usually impose administrative entry restrictions on foreign citizens in three ways - countries whose nationals may enter without a visa, countries whose nationals may obtain a visa on arrival and countries whose nationals require a visa in advance. Nationals who require a visa in advance are usually advised to obtain them at a diplomatic mission of their destination country. Several countries allow nationals of countries that require a visa to obtain them online.

Every category of U.S. nonimmigrant (temporary) visa has its own rule as to how long you will be permitted to stay in the United States. Don’t be confused by expecting this to be the expiration date on the visa that you receive at the U.S. consulate in your home country – that date merely shows the last day upon which you can use it to enter the United States. The exact date upon which you must DEPART the U.S. will be shown on your I-94 arrival/departure record.


What Is a Visa?   |   What Is a Travel/Tourist Visa?   |   What Is a Work Visa?   |   What Is a Business Visa?   |   What Is a Student Visa?   |   What Is a Refugee/Asylum Visa?   |   What Is a Working Holiday Visa?   |   What Is a Spousal Visa?   |   What Is a Transit Visa?   |   What Is an eVisa?   |   Immigrant Vs. Nonimmigrant Visas   |   What Does a Visa Look Like?   |   Why Do I Need a Visa to Travel?   |   What Is a Visa Policy?   |   Why Do Certain Countries Have Visa Restrictions?   |   When Do I Need a Visa?   |   How Do I Apply for a Visa?   |   What Are the Requirements for a Visa?   |   What Are the Supporting Documents Required for Visitor Visas?   |   What Is an Invitation Letter for a Visa?   |   What to Expect During a Visa Interview?   |   What Are the Fees for Obtaining a Visa?   |   What Are Visa Processing Times?   |   What Visa Services Does an Embassy Offer?   |   What Can I Learn From the Visa Restrictions Index?   |   Which Countries Can I Travel to Visa-Free?   |   How Are Travel Visas Linked to My Passport?   |   Visa-Free Vs. Visa on Arrival Vs. Visa Required   |   What Are the US Visa Restrictions?   |   Which Countries Can I Visit Visa-Free With the US Passport?   |   How Many Visitor Visas Does the US Accept and Reject Each Year?   |   Which Countries Can I Visit With a Schengen Visa?   |   When Was the First Visa Ever Issued?   |   Global Visa Issuance Over Time
An ASEAN common visa scheme has been considered with Thailand and the "CLMV" countries of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam opting in earlier. After talk arose of a CLMV common visa,[91] with Thailand being omitted, Thailand initiated and began implementation of a trial common visa with Cambodia, but cited security risks as the major hurdle. The trial run was delayed,[92] but Thailand implemented a single visa scheme with Cambodia beginning on December 27, 2012, on a trial basis.[93]
Here are the easy Steps for US Visitors Visa Application Step 1: Get a Digital Photo and a paper photo for each applicant. Step 2: Filled a DS-160 Application Form Step 3: Pay the Visa Application Fee $140 for Tourist Visa Application Fee Step 4: Schedule Interview / Appointment Step 5: Attend to your U.S Tourist Visa Interview learn more : http://travelstate.info/us-tourist-visa-application-india/
Visa Waiver Program travelers who have not obtained approval through Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) should expect to be denied boarding on any air carrier bound for the United States. If you are allowed to board, you can expect to encounter significant delays and possible denial of admission at the U.S. port of entry (i.e., arrival airport). ESTA registration usually only takes a few minutes to complete,  authorization often arrives in seconds, and is valid for two years, or until the expiration date of your passport, whichever comes first.
The Form I-20 is an official U.S. Government form, issued by a certified school, which a prospective nonimmigrant student must have in order to get an F-1 or M-1 visa. Form I-20 acts as proof-of-acceptance and contains the information necessary to pay the SEVIS I-901 fee, apply for a visa or change visa status, and be admitted into the United States. The Form I-20 has the student's SEVIS identification number, which starts with the letter N and is followed by ten digits, on the top left of the form.
Every country processes visa applications at a different rate. Make sure to check the government website of the country you intend to visit to find out how fast they process visa applications. For example, visa applications from Russia to visit Canada take approximately 8 days to process, while Canadians looking to travel to India are advised to submit visa applications at least 15 days in advance.
In the event the PPEF was not included in a ticket issued on or after January 1, 2018, it shall remain the responsibility of the airline to transmit the appropriate fee per arriving passenger to the National Treasury. For any tickets sold prior to January 1, 2018, with the passenger arriving and/or departing after January 1st, the BCBP shall continue to collect and charge the same fees totalling Fifty Dollars ($50 USD) upon departure for any airline passenger who arrived in the Republic of Palau prior to the PPEF implementation date and is departing on a ticket purchased before January 1, 2018. The amount collected upon departure in this situation shall be a Thirty Dollar ($30 USD) “Green Fee” and Twenty Dollar ($20 US) departure tax for a total of Fifty Dollars ($50 USD) for every non-Palauan passport holder. Such passenger must provide a copy of their ticket and any other supporting documentation as required.
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